Important Notice

This is a general assessment and only a rough indication of your levels of emotional fitness. It is not scientifically verified.

Some emotional issues may require the intervention of professionals such as clinical psychologists or psychiatrists. Please seek individual professional guidance for any difficulties you may have in your mental and emotional health. The quiz does not replace the need for personal assessment of your skills.

Professional EI Assessment

If you would like a scientifically verifiable assessment we recommend that you have your emotional intelligence assessed on the Genos 360 emotional intelligence inventory.

Emotional Intelligence Products

The EI Institute offers Australasia's premier range of Emotional Intelligence CDs, DVDs and MP3s, ebooks and books.

Test 4: How good are you at job interviews?

Learn the skills you need! Your score is 10-19.

You probably find job interviews daunting. So many good people, such as yourself, miss out on jobs they deserve because they get so nervous attending a job interview. I suspect from your scores that this could be you. You may also feel very uncomfortable talking about yourself and fear that you will go blank or embarrass yourself, you may even have been brought up to believe that you shouldn't brag or blow your own trumpet.  

The top score possible is 60 and the lowest is 10. You are probably undermining your chances in your job interviews by:

  • Not being able to explain what you are really good at.
  • Letting your nerves get the better of you.
  • Either not saying enough or waffling on without getting to a point.

Don't sell yourself short! There is a lot you can learn to improve your skills.

Here are three key tips to get you on your way:

  1. To help you overcome your nerves on the day focus on the panel and not on yourself. You are not going to a job interview to be interrogated, you are going to an interview to help the panel to pick you. Therefore, do everything you can to make it easy for the panel to know how good you are, because without your help they will find it very difficult. Of course, the panel may also be nervous because they worry about whether they are picking the right person or not. When you focus on helping the panel your own nerves and self-consciousness can diminish.
  2. If you have been brought up to believe that it's bragging to talk about yourself understand the difference between bragging and selling yourself at a job interview. When you sell yourself you are simply making factual statements about what you can do and how well you can do this. This is different from bragging which is about comparing yourself to other people and saying "I am the best".
  3. Practise out loud. When people are nervous they often spend a lot of time writing up possible answers to interview questions or muttering them under their breath. This is not sufficient. You need to be able to talk about yourself in the job interview so practise your answers out loud. Get used to hearing your own voice, get used to talking about yourself, and get used to explaining your answers verbally, not just in writing.

I strongly recommend that you now obtain a copy of the e-book: "Job interviews: How to sell yourself and help the panel pick you". You may be surprised just how much there is to learn. There are around 120, A4 pages of tips, techniques and skills for you, including a whole chapter on how to settle your interview nerves.

Once you know exactly what to do and how to do the right preparation your confidence can soar and your nerves ease. It may then seem much easier.

You can always follow-up with a personalised 1-1 job interviews coaching session if you wish. If so, and you have already bought the book, I will take the price of the book off the cost of your session, if you mention this test.

I am here to help you get that job. The skills can be learnt. Let the learning begin!

Rachel Green