1. The emotional intelligence film made by teenagers
17 September, 2013
Editor in Adolescent EI, EI in Schools, EI resources for teachers & parents, Emotional issues in teenagers, Emotional self-management in teenagers, Roleystone community college, emotional intelligence film, feeling hurt, feeling isolated, feeling resentful, social media, teenage relationships, teenagers

Written by Rachel Green, Director, The Emotional Intelligence Institute, accredited user of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso-Emotional-Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) and author of "How to develop emotional resilience and manage your emotions."

An emotional intelligence film: "Bitchiness, jealousy and boys" has been made by the students and film institute at Roleystone Community College. I acted as a resource for them, and Andrew Pheasant, Deputy Principal at the school, guided them through the process.

This is a film to discuss with teenagers and young adults to help them develop their emotional intelligence. It shows how emotions can build barriers between teenagers in typical situations that they deal with, e.g. relationships with the opposite sex, rivalry amongst peers and friends, being on Facebook, going to parties, and more. Solutions to the problems are also shown.

In this article we describe the film and its script, which was written by the teenagers involved. The actual film follows the description below, and there is a free copy of the teachers' and parents' discussion guide for you to download towards the end of the article.

The emotional intelligence plot

Ivy, is pretty and popular but Scarlet, her friend, is jealous and doesn't invite her to her party. Driven by her emotions of jealousy she starts bitching and backstabbing Ivy and spreading rumours about her; but what will be the fallout?

Emotional intelligence involves being aware of how you feel and managing your emotions intelligently. Does Ivy have the emotional maturity to deal with feeling hurt or does she get even on Facebook and refuse ever to talk to Scarlett again? You'll need to watch the film to find out.

This film is a great emotional intelligence resource, an ideal discussion point when teaching emotional intelligence in schools or wanting to develop emotional intelligence in the workplace. It shows many different components of emotional intelligence and the benefits of developing it. 

If you haven't seen it already, you can watch the film below.

The emotional intelligence film: Bitchiness, jealousy and boys

Follow-up videos after the emotional intelligence film

There is a series of four follow-up videos to watch once you have seen the film. Each video explores a different aspect of emotional intelligence from the perspective of the actors, writers, crew, producers and EI coach and what they now know about emotional intelligence.

The follow-up videos add further resources for teachers, teenagers and parents on emotional intelligence.  

There is also a list of questions you can use to guide a discussion on emotions and emotional intelligence with your students and teenagers, once you have all watched the film.

Here are all the videos related to the emotional intelligence film:

Here is the teachers' and parents' guide to help you generate relevant questions to discuss with your teenagers: "The emotional intelligence film: Teachers' guide".

Develop your school's emotional intelligence

There is so much that your leadership team can do to develop their emotional intelligence and the emotional intelligence of their school. We have a number of options to help:

  1. There is a series of emotional intelligence workshops, including: "Mastering emotional intelligence". 
  2. There is an emotional intelligence 2 DVD program "How to develop emotional resilience and manage your emotions".
  3. We provide a face-to-face 5 star emotional intelligence coaching package which can be conducted online or in our Kelmscott office.
  4. Emotional intelligence asessments can be conducted using the MSCEIT.
  5. We can also bring a whole emotional intelligence programme to your entire school for your students and teachers, under the guidance of Professor Con Stough.

For more details, or to make a booking, e-mail us now or pick up the phone and call us.

Develop the emotional intelligence of your teachers now and be an emotionally intelligent school.

Article originally appeared on The Emotional Intelligence Institute (http://www.theeiinstitute.com/).
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