What is EI? Articles

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Thursday
Sep012011

« 33. EI case study: Anxiety and performance feedback »

Written by Rachel Green. Director, The Emotional Intelligence Institute, accredited MSCEIT consultant.

The need to provide and receive performance reviews and ongoing feedback is essential in every work and business environment, and for every manager, executive and business owner.

It is also impacted by the levels of emotional intelligence of the people involved.

The ability to manage your own emotions is a very important part of giving and receiving feedback. Giving and receiving negative feedback is often an emotionally charged event.

Do you ever avoid giving feedback or soften it because of how you feel about giving it? I have met many managers and executives who do.

This emotional intelligence case study looks at managing anxiety and performance feedback.

Find out how to take the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso-Emotional-Intelligence-Test (MSCEIT) by clicking here and get feedback on the results from our Director, emotional intelligence specialist, Rachel Green.

What emotions can undermine performance feedback?

Case study of emotional intelligence

An executive, Christopher, needed to provide one of his senior managers with feedback on his poor performance. The previous executive had failed to approach this manager on his poor performance and it had been allowed to continue and become entrenched.

How did Christopher feel?

Christopher felt anxious about doing this as he was concerned his manager would get upset and start blaming him, or worse still, get angry and undermine him later by spreading malicious gossip.

He felt uncomfortable with strong displays of emotions and wasn't sure he had the skills to handle them. He preferred to avoid conflict.

Further resources on the Mayer Salovey emotional intelligence model.

What would people with low emotional intelligence do?

Typically people with low emotional intelligence would avoid this situation, put it off, or soften the feedback that is given so that direct feedback is avoided.

They may even give excuses for the feedback not being needed. One CEO said to me once, "He is an executive, I shouldn't have to give him feedback, he should be self-motivated". The real reason for this was that he felt too uncomfortable to approach one of his team on longstanding issues which he'd inherited. He just hoped the problems would go away.

This is a scenario played out in organisations and businesses on a daily basis.

Want to do the MSCEIT to measure your emotional intelligence? It is the gold-standard ability measure. To find out how to take the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso-Emotional-Intelligence-Test and gain feedback on the results from our Director, emotional intelligence specialist, Rachel Green, click here

What would people with high emotional intelligence do?

Christopher had high emotional intelligence and was able to manage his emotions.

He took action to manage his anxiety.

  1. He prepared carefully what he would say.
  2. He sought advice on how to handle any displays of emotion.
  3. He let the other members of the executive know so they could be forewarned in case of any fallout.
  4. He listened to relaxing music before going to bed the night before.
  5. He went for a walk first thing in the morning.

Christopher went ahead with the session. He was honest and clear in the feedback he gave while also being respectful.

He listened to the manager's input without becoming defensive, even though he could feel himself sweating.

He still felt anxious about giving the feedback, but he managed his anxiety sufficiently well to still do the job that he needed to do.

This is being emotionally intelligent on the fifth dimension of emotional intelligence: emotional self-management.

How skilled are you in managing your emotions?

Do you ever avoid giving feedback because of how you feel about doing so?

Emotional self-management is a critical skill in the workplace for any supervisor, manager or executive to have.

Have your emotional intelligence assessed now.

Want to know how high your emotional intelligence is? There is another model of emotional intelligence, by Salovey and Mayer, that has an ability-based emotional intelligence test called the MSCEIT which you can complete online.

Click here to find out how to take the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso-Emotional-Intelligence-Test (MSCEIT) and gain feedback on the results from our Director, emotional intelligence specialist, Rachel Green.

Develop your emotional intelligence now

We have many resources plus coaching packages to help you. Click here for the 5 star emotional intelligence coaching package, or for more details or to make a booking e-mail us now or pick up the phone and call us.

Develop your emotional intelligence now and lead a happier, more productive life and improve your work relationships, whether with colleagues, stakeholders or customers.